Elanore Hargreaves, Assessment for learning? Thinking outside the (black) box, Cambridge Journal of Education, vol.35, No. 2, pp.213-224

eleanore-hargreaves

Elanore Hargreaves (2005) Assessment for learning? Thinking outside the (black) box, Cambridge Journal of Education, vol.35, No. 2, pp.213-224.

 

” ‘Assessment for learning’ is categorized as meaning: monitoring pupils’ performance against targets or objectives; using assessment to inform next steps in teaching and learning; teachers giving feedback for improvement; (teachers) learning about children’s learning; children taking some control of their own learning and assessment; and turning assessment into a learning event.” (Hargreaves, 2005, p.213).

Hargreaves surveyed 83 teachers and head teachers as to their understanding of ‘assessment for learning’. These teachers responded in ways that were able to be classified into 6 separate categories:

Assessment for learning meaning:

  1. monitoring pupils’ performance against targets objectives (p.214)
  2. using assessment to inform next steps in teaching and learning (p.215).
  3. teachers giving feedback for improvement (p.215).
  4. (teachers) learning about children’s learning (p.216).
  5. children taking some control of their own learning and assessment (p.217).
  6. turning assessment into a learning event (p.217).

 

This research reveals 2 implicit conceptions of  assessment:

  1. Assessment as equated with measurement
  2. Assessment equated with inquiry

 

This research reveals 2 implicit conceptions of learning:

  1. learning as attaining objectives
  2. learning as constructing (or co-constructing) knowledge

 

The dominant versions of each of these are so not because of their efficacy or legitimacy as approaches to learning, rather they are dominant because of political or financial concerns and constraints (p.223).

 

 

 

 

Questions that this article raises for me within higher education:

  1. Can a University’s policy (academic/education, etc) be seen as having a “learning” perspective that drives behaviour?
    (the equivalent to the National Curriculum mentioned in the article (p. 220.).

 

 

 

References that I should read:

Askew, S. & Lodge, C. (2000) Gifts, ping-pong and loops – linking feedback and learning, in: S.Askew (Ed.) Feedback for learning (London, RoutledgeFalmer). 

Sfard, A. (1998) On two metaphors for learning and the dangers of choosing just one, Educational Researcher, 27(2), 4 – 13.